Elizabeth Montagu
and the Bluestocking Circle
         is Funded by the AHRC
 
 

How to get to Swansea University

http://www.swansea.ac.uk/alumniandvisitors/howtogethere

The railway station is ten minutes’ walk from the Quadrant bus station in the city centre from where various buses go to the university. But you can also take the Metro bus (4/4A) West which goes directly from the railway station to the university campus.

For buses to and from Swansea and within Swansea, try
http://www.swanseacitycentre.com/media/pdf/r/m/25860-10_Bus_Station_lft_(2).pdf

Finding your way around during the conference
Swansea is situated on a sweeping bay with the port, marina and city centre at the Eastern end and the picturesque fishing village of Mumbles, with its restaurants and bars, a few miles round to the West. There is a pleasant footpath around the bay if you go by foot or bike. There are also plenty of buses along the A4067 (the coastal Oystermouth Road), for example the 3/3A which travels between the city centre and Mumbles and passes the university. The university campus is about 25 minutes’ walk from the city centre or 15 minutes’ bus ride.

Bus routes and travelling by foot to the conference:

Buses from the city centre
If you are staying in the city centre at Morgan’s Hotel or the Dragon Hotel for example, go to the Quadrant Bus station where you will easily find buses to the university.

Buses and foot paths from the Marina
If you are staying in the Marina at Marriott Hotel for example, take the no 4 Metro bus West on the main road or walk along the long foot path that sweeps along the bay from the Marriott Hotel and the Marina to the University.

Buses from the Mumbles
If you are staying in the Mumbles at Patrick’s Hotel for example, take a bus East, including the 2/2A and 2B, along the Oystermouth road towards the city centre and you will pass the university on your left.

Buses and travelling by foot from Brynmill or Sketty
If you stay in Brynmill you can easily walk to the university, but if you stay in Uplands or Sketty then you may need a taxi.

Conference locations outside of the University Campus

The National Waterfront museum, the location of the public lecture on the second day of the conference, is five minutes’ walk from Marriott and any city centre hotel. It is 30 minutes’ walk from the university.

The Patti Raj Restaurant, the location for the conference dinner on the Friday, is ten minutes’ walk from Marriott’s or 15 minutes’ walk from the city centre. It is 20 minutes’ walk from the university.
http://www.pattipavilion.co.uk/raj_home.html

Nearby

Joggers like the path around the bay where there are outside exercise machines. Outdoor swimmers should take the 118 bus to the Gower peninsula where all the beaches are blue flag/ highest water quality. Indoor swimmers can use the Wales National Pool five minutes’ walk from the main university campus.
http://www.walesnationalpoolswansea.co.uk

Strollers might like the Botanical Gardens or Clyne gardens or the boating lake which are all a few minutes’ walk from the university.
http://www.swansea.gov.uk/index.cfm?articleid=1348

City Centre

There’s a tourist information centre at the Quadrant near the bus station in the city centre. If it’s raining, then Plantasia in the city centre is worth visiting, as are the Glyn Vivian Art Gallery, the Dylan Thomas Centre and the Swansea Museum. The city was the birthplace of Dylan Thomas and his boathouse home in Laugharne would make an excellent day trip.
http://www.dylanthomas.com
 
 
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Bluestocking Circle

The Bluestocking Circle was a group of writers, artists and thinkers who met in the London homes of Elizabeth Montagu, Elizabeth Vesey and Frances Boscawen. These fashionable hostesses invented a new kind of informal sociability and nurtured a sense of intellectual community. The term "bluestocking" evolved from the scholar Benjamin Stillingfleet's decision to abandon formal evening dress and obey Vesey's call to "Come in your blue stockings." Guests included the leading literary, political and cultural figures of the day, including Elizabeth Carter, Samuel Johnson, Edmund Burke, David and Eva Garrick and later Hannah More and Frances Burney.

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